East Penn Press

Saturday, August 18, 2018

Local crafters found at Musikfest

Wednesday, December 31, 1969 by in

Emmaus Moravian Church holds Vacation Bible School

Wednesday, December 31, 1969 by in

COMMUNITY CALENDAR

Wednesday, December 31, 1969 by in

Aug. 15

Alburtis area 55+ seniors meet noon at the Alburtis Gun Club. Hot dogs are served with a pot luck luncheon plus bingo. There are many bus trips. For more information, call 610-966-4996.

Aug. 17

Vacation Bible School: LOST: Searching for Truth, Finding Christ at Emmanuel Assembly of God, 1431 Lehigh Parkway East, Allentown, 6 to 8:30 p.m. through Aug. 17. Children ages four through sixth grade are invited to explore a tropical jungle in search of ultimate truth found in Christ. For more informaiton, contact PastorCalebCook@Gmail.com or call 910-691-8068.

Aug. 18

School’s Out Band will perform at East Texas Park, 5624 East Texas Road, East Texas, 6 to 8:30 p.m.

“Facing the Giants” movie 7 p.m. at St. Mark’s U.C.C., 52 E. Susquehanna St., Allentown. This is a free event. Snacks will be provided. For more information, call 610-769-8326.

Aug. 30

Upper Milford Historical Society meeting, 7 p.m. at the Upper Milford Township building, Old Zionsville. Harry Anselmo will present the program, “Bee Keeping in the Old Days.” Refreshments will be provided and everyone is welcome. For more information, call 610-966-4376.

Sept. 10

The League of Women Voters of Lehigh County hot topics lunch 11:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. at the Superior Restaurant, Emmaus. The topic will be “Plastics and the Shale Gas Industry.” To make a reservation, contact lwvlehigh@yahoo.com or call 610-432-1456.

Mudsnails found in Little Lehigh

Wednesday, December 31, 1969 by in

Our popular Little Lehigh Creek has a problem, according to the PA Fish & Boat Commission. And it’s called Mudsnails.

The PFBC says that after confirming the presence of the aquatic invasive species (Potamopyrgus antipodarium) in Little Lehigh Creek, the agency is reminding anglers and boaters that cleaning their gear is the easiest, most effective means of preventing its spread to other waters.

PFBC biologists collected mudsnail specimens this month in the creek west of Emmaus, near the Wildlands Conservancy. New Zealand mudsnail expert Dr. Edward Levri, of Penn State, and PFBC Lead AIS Ecologist Bob Morgan confirmed the identity.

New Zealand mudsnails are very small, measuring less than one-quarter inch, with a relatively long, narrow, spiral shell that is generally brown to almost black in color.

Like other aquatic invasive species, they disrupt ecosystems by rapidly multiplying and competing with native species for space and food.

“Based on studies conducted in western U.S. streams, if the population grows quickly, they could become the dominant organisms in the benthic - or bottom dwelling - community, upon which many other species depend for food,” said Morgan. “The first known occurrence of the New Zealand mudsnail on the Atlantic slope of the Eastern U.S. was discovered about five years ago in Spring Creek, Centre County. Whether there is a connection with the infestation in Little Lehigh Creek is unknown at this time, but hopefully future genetic studies will give the answer.

“The effects of the snail in Atlantic slope streams on higher organisms, such as fish, are not certain at this time.”

New Zealand mudsnails were discovered in the Snake River in Idaho and Wyoming in 1987; in Lake Ontario and the St. Lawrence River in 1991; and in Lake Erie about 4 miles north of Presque Isle Bay in 2007.

Additional populations were found in a small stream near the Niagara River in New York in 2008 and in another Lake Ontario tributary in 2011.

New Zealand mudsnails have recently been found in the Gunpowder River in Maryland and in the Musconetcong River in New Jersey, which is a tributary of the Delaware River.

“Spring Creek and Little Lehigh Creek have at least one thing in common - they are both heavily fished streams, with anglers traveling to them from all over,” added Morgan. “Given the presence of the mudsnail in other areas of the country, it’s not surprising they have been found here.

“As with many aquatic invasive species, they are nearly impossible to eradicate once established. This is even more difficult with the Mudsnail because it usually takes only one small snail to be able to produce offspring. But we must do our best to slow its spread to other waters.”

Anglers and boaters are urged to clean their gear before leaving a waterway and entering another one.

New Zealand mudsnails require some specialized disinfection measures. Gear should be visually inspected and any clinging matter should be removed and disposed of in the trash.

To kill mudsnails, three methods are effective. Gear can be frozen for a minimum of eight hours, or it can be soaked in very hot water with detergent (120-140 degrees) for 10 minutes.

A 2005 study by the California Department of Fish and Game showed that mudsnails can be killed by soaking gear for five minutes in a one-to-one solution of Formula 409 Cleaner Degreaser Disinfectant, and water. After soaking gear for five minutes, thoroughly rinse it with plain water.

Simply spraying gear with the disinfectant or the mixture does not work. Also, general cleaners such as regular off-the-shelf Formula 409 have not been shown to be effective.

If you suspect that you have found New Zealand mudsnail (or any other AIS) in another waterway, please report them at: http://pfbc.pa.gov/forms/reportAIS.htm.

When reporting a sighting it’s very important to include as much information as possible including close-up photos of the organism, the exact location (GPS coordinates work best), a description of what you found, and your contact information.

For more information about New Zealand Mudsnail, visit https://seagrant.psu.edu/section/fact-sheets-brochures and scroll down to the Mudsnail link.

Bulls-Giants knotted at 1-1 in BML

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Heading up to the Blue Mountain League championship series, the Northampton Giants had coasted throughout the playoffs. The Giants took Game 1 of the finals against the Limeport Bulls last week to continue that hot streak.

And while Game 2 wouldn’t decide the series, Limeport took it as a must-win situation. Then, the Bulls did what no other team could do in the postseason thus far: they beat the Giants.

Limeport got a complete game five-hitter from Cooper Michael on Saturday, and the Bulls used an early lead to defeat top-seeded Northampton, 7-1. Game 3, originally schedule for Monday, was postponed due to heavy rain again on Tuesday and rescheduled for Wednesday.

“Game 2 was an absolute must win for us in our mind, being that we were at home, had our ace on the mound and were down in the series,” Bulls player-manager Mike Cudwadie said. “So, I feel like we came into the game knowing we had to win that one.

“Cooper has been our ace all year long, and we know exactly what we’re going to get when he is on the mound. We knew if we could get him a few runs we would probably be in a good spot, and I know he enjoys the run support. He threw an incredible game shutting down a very good offense in Northampton.”

Northampton had been the hottest hitting team in the league all season, and that continued throughout the playoffs. The Giants scored four runs in the Game 1 victory and their 205 runs scored in the regular season were the most of any squad.

But Michael had Northampton’s number on the Bulls’ home field. Other than a run in the top of the fourth inning that got Northampton on the board and cut Limeport’s lead to 3-1, Michael was efficient and effective.

Limeport, which struggled to put runners on base in Game 1, bounced back in a big way out of the gate. Three runs in the bottom of the third inning, including an RBI-single from Damin Muth, gave the Bulls that key early lead they so desperately needed.

“Unlike in Game 1, we got runners on base early and leadoff guys on, which allowed us to play our style of baseball with bunting guys over and bunting for hits,” Cudwadie said. “We put pressure on their defense. They made a couple of mistakes which led to more runs for us.”

After Northampton got on the scoreboard in the fourth inning, Limeport added two more runs in the bottom half of the frame to end any threat of a comeback. CJ Salisbury recorded an RBI-single in the sixth, a part of a two-run inning that ended Limeport’s scoring day.

“Jumping out to the lead was extremely big for us because it allowed Cooper to go right at them,” Cudwadie said. “It was also very important to add on and not just sit on the 3-0 lead, but to also add runs and get to seven was huge.”

Two games have already been postponed in this series. With each of the past two rounds of the BML playoffs being interrupted by weather postponements, both teams are just hoping to get back on the field shortly.

“It’s now down to a best-of-three series, and we know we have to go and steal a game at Northampton,” Cudwadie said. “Our goal is to go up and grab Game 3, so we can come back to Limeport with a chance to win it. Hopefully the rain allows us to play these games sooner rather than later.”

NFF holds LV Football Media Day

Wednesday, December 31, 1969 by in

As high school football teams were just beginning their first week of preseason preparation last week, the National Football Foundation’s Lehigh Valley Chapter held its first ever Lehigh Valley Football Media Day.

Coaches from all 33 teams in the NFF-LV area were invited to come to Northampton High School’s Erdosy Stadium with their team captains to talk about the upcoming season.

“I would say it’s about time,” Northwestern Lehigh head coach Josh Snyder said. “The Schuylkill League does a league event. I would love a Colonial League Media Day. For an organization to step up and have a Lehigh Valley media day is great. The kids deserve it. The program’s deserve it. It’s fun and it’s exciting.”

Parkland fullback/linebacker Nick Suriel, whose team is a six-time defending District 11 champion, said it was nice to see the competition on friendly terms before meeting them again with the pads on. But the event was more about celebrating the sport they love.

“This is cool to see our competition,” Suriel said. “We know most of these kids in the Lehigh Valley. At the end of the day it’s all about everyone in the Lehigh Valley coming together for a sport they love.

The Trojans will be a favorite to continue their success, but several teams shouldn’t be too far behind, including last year’s Class 4A district champ Bethlehem Catholic, District 11 Class 6A finalist Freedom and an Emmaus team that returns most of its skill players and added transfer quarterback Ethan Parvel, who was one of the top QBs in the league last year at Whitehall.

“I’m excited because I have a bunch of great kids,” said Hornet head coach Harold Fairclough. “It’s one thing to have talented kids, but when they work hard and do what you ask them to do and seem to enjoy doing it with each other it seems to make a difference.”

Bethlehem Catholic is coming off a run to the state semifinals, where it lost to Imhotep Charter. Parkland got to the state quarterfinals in Class 6A, while Freedom entered districts as a six seed and reached its second consecutive district title game last season.

In the Colonial League, Palisades went 10-0 for last year’s league title, while Southern Lehigh was 9-1.

Salisbury sent senior captains Jacob Kamp, Dan Jennings and Delano Mackenzie to the media day event.

The Falcons are coming off a 4-6 regular season. They reached the District 11 Class 3A playoffs last season but fell in the first round to Lehighton.

“We have a team goal of getting to districts again,” said Kamp, a three-year varsity starter who has played every offensive skill position as well as linebacker and safety. “Going into this season we worked a lot and we definitely have a good team chemistry this year.”

Last year injuries and low numbers forced a lot of freshmen and sophomores into action on Friday nights. This year those players bring that experience and it should lead to a few more wins this year.

“The experience we were getting is essential,” said Mackenzie, a three-year varsity player who will play cornerback and wide receiver this season. “My sophomore year I got a lot of time on special teams as well as offense and defense. That really prepared me for my junior year.

“We’ve been to districts two of the past three years and we haven’t won a game yet. We have a goal of getting above .500. We want to get to districts and want to win a district game.”

The Falcons numbers are up this year and they have been working hard to improve the program.

“Our weight room numbers were pretty good this year,” said Jennings. “We had a lot of new kids come out along with the kids that have been here. We got a lot stronger and faster.”

Police conduct checkpoint along Musikfest corridor

Wednesday, December 31, 1969 by in

Police from several Lehigh County municipalities participated Aug. 10 in a sobriety checkpoint along Broadway in Salisbury Township, near its border with Fountain Hill Borough, under the auspices of the Lehigh Valley Regional DUI Task Force.

Broadway is a busy corridor for drivers going to and from the 10-day Musikfest activities held every August in Bethlehem. The safety detail began 11 p.m. Aug. 10 and lasted through 4 a.m. Aug. 11.

The Lehigh Valley Regional DUI Task Force is a multi-jurisdictional cooperative law enforcement effort to implement sustained DUI enforcement activities. The task force is funded by a Pennsylvania Department of Transportation grant which is administered by the South Whitehall Police Department. Capt. Jason Negron is the program coordinator and Sgt. George Hummel is his assistant.

The task force participates in a statewide initiative to reduce the number of deaths and injuries on highways caused by intoxicated and chemically impaired drivers. The task force conducts sobriety checkpoints and roving patrols on area roadways known to experience a high level of alcohol-related accidents and/or arrests. The task force also conducts mobile awareness patrols to gather traffic flow data and gain public exposure. Police departments in the task force participate in numerous community events to help educate the public about the danger of driving under the influence of alcohol and controlled substances and the impact it has on everyone involved.

The task force is comprised of 14 Lehigh County police departments and works closely with the Allentown Police Department and the Pennsylvania State Police in joint task force efforts.

Police participating in the task force have made contact with thousands of motorists and have apprehended hundreds of impaired drivers over nearly two decades of operation.

Hummel, who coordinated the checkpoint’s activities, said Aug. 10, “Our goal is to reduce impaired driving by increasing public awareness of the problems associated with impaired driving and to increase public perception of the fear of apprehension of driving while impaired.”

A number of motorists were detained for field sobriety tests during the operation and arrests were made of drivers found impaired.

NFF holds football media day

Wednesday, December 31, 1969 by in

As high school football teams were just beginning their first week of preseason preparation last week, the National Football Foundation’s Lehigh Valley Chapter held its first ever Lehigh Valley Football Media Day.

Coaches from all 33 teams in the NFF-LV area were invited to come to Northampton High School’s Erdosy Stadium with their team captains to talk about the upcoming season.

“I would say it’s about time,” Northwestern Lehigh head coach Josh Snyder said. “The Schuylkill League does a league event. I would love a Colonial League Media Day. For an organization to step up and have a Lehigh Valley media day is great. The kids deserve it. The program’s deserve it. It’s fun and it’s exciting.”

Parkland fullback/linebacker Nick Suriel, whose team is a six-time defending District 11 champion, said it was nice to see the competition on friendly terms before meeting them again with the pads on. But the event was more about celebrating the sport they love.

“This is cool to see our competition,” he said. “We know most of these kids in the Lehigh Valley. At the end of the day it’s all about everyone in the Lehigh Valley coming together for a sport they love.

The Trojans will be a favorite to continue their success, but several teams shouldn’t be too far behind, including last year’s Class 4A district champ Bethlehem Catholic, District 11 Class 6A finalist Freedom and an Emmaus team that returns most of its skill players and added transfer quarterback Ethan Parvel, who was one of the top QBs in the league last year at Whitehall.

“I’m excited because I have a bunch of great kids,” said Hornet head coach Harold Fairclough. “It’s one thing to have talented kids, but when they work hard and do what you ask them to do and seem to enjoy doing it with each other it seems to make a difference.”

Bethlehem Catholic is coming off a run to the state semifinals, where it lost to Imhotep Charter. Parkland got to the state quarterfinals in Class 6A, while Freedom entered districts as a six seed and reached its second consecutive district title game last season.

Emmaus, which has lost to Freedom in each of the past two district tournaments, returns three-year starting running backs in Sone Ntoh and Lubens Myers. It also has some pas catchers that got significant playing time last year. But the Hornets graduated five linemen who were all two-year starters. Owen Minnix is the only returning starter up front.

“It’s going to come down to how well our line gels,” said Fairclough. “If they come together up front its going to be fun to watch. We graduated all five guys. All five were two-year starters. We have two guys back, Owen Minnix and Lance Hoch, who also played a bunch last year due to injuries.”

Emmaus won a share of the Eastern Pennsylvania Conference title in 2016 and went 6-4 last year to earn the No. 3 seed in districts. The Hornets are looking to become a team that is consistently competing for league and district titles. In his third season at the helm, Fairclough has the program headed in that direction.

“That’s the goal,” he said. “When we got here as a staff that’s what we wanted to do. We wanted to set the expectations higher. This program for a long time has been right in the middle of the road. These guys have the talent and the work ethic to take it to another level.”

Bulls-Giants knotted at 1-1 in BML finals

Wednesday, December 31, 1969 by in

Heading up to the Blue Mountain League championship series, the Northampton Giants had coasted throughout the playoffs. The Giants took Game 1 of the finals against the Limeport Bulls last week to continue that hot streak.

And while Game 2 wouldn’t decide the series, Limeport took it as a must-win situation. Then, the Bulls did what no other team could do in the postseason thus far: they beat the Giants.

Limeport got a complete game five-hitter from Cooper Michael on Saturday, and the Bulls used an early lead to defeat top-seeded Northampton, 7-1. Game 3, originally schedule for Monday, was postponed due to heavy rain again on Tuesday and rescheduled for Wednesday.

“Game 2 was an absolute must win for us in our mind, being that we were at home, had our ace on the mound and were down in the series,” Bulls player-manager Mike Cudwadie said. “So, I feel like we came into the game knowing we had to win that one.

“Cooper has been our ace all year long, and we know exactly what we’re going to get when he is on the mound. We knew if we could get him a few runs we would probably be in a good spot, and I know he enjoys the run support. He threw an incredible game shutting down a very good offense in Northampton.”

Northampton had been the hottest hitting team in the league all season, and that continued throughout the playoffs. The Giants scored four runs in the Game 1 victory and their 205 runs scored in the regular season were the most of any squad.

But Michael had Northampton’s number on the Bulls’ home field. Other than a run in the top of the fourth inning that got Northampton on the board and cut Limeport’s lead to 3-1, Michael was efficient and effective.

Limeport, which struggled to put runners on base in Game 1, bounced back in a big way out of the gate. Three runs in the bottom of the third inning, including an RBI-single from Damin Muth, gave the Bulls that key early lead they so desperately needed.

“Unlike in Game 1, we got runners on base early and leadoff guys on, which allowed us to play our style of baseball with bunting guys over and bunting for hits,” Cudwadie said. “We put pressure on their defense. They made a couple of mistakes which led to more runs for us.”

After Northampton got on the scoreboard in the fourth inning, Limeport added two more runs in the bottom half of the frame to end any threat of a comeback. CJ Salisbury recorded an RBI-single in the sixth, a part of a two-run inning that ended Limeport’s scoring day.

“Jumping out to the lead was extremely big for us because it allowed Cooper to go right at them,” Cudwadie said. “It was also very important to add on and not just sit on the 3-0 lead, but to also add runs and get to seven was huge.”

Two games have already been postponed in this series. With each of the past two rounds of the BML playoffs being interrupted by weather postponements, both teams are just hoping to get back on the field shortly.

“It’s now down to a best-of-three series, and we know we have to go and steal a game at Northampton,” Cudwadie said. “Our goal is to go up and grab Game 3, so we can come back to Limeport with a chance to win it. Hopefully the rain allows us to play these games sooner rather than later.”

Commissioners talk immigration status

Wednesday, December 31, 1969 by in

Lehigh County Board of Commissioners gave preliminary approval for the 2019-20 Capital Plan July 25. In gross numbers, the plan calls for a five-year total expenditure of $129,107,334.

The first reading of the plan passed 8-0. Commissioner Brad Osborne was absent.

Some big-ticket expenses being funded in 2019 include replacement of the voting system — $3.5 million; the Coplay to Northampton Bridge — $5 million; courthouse upgrades — $1.06 million.

The fledgling Pennsylvania Music Preservation Society, headed by former Allentown City mayoral candidate and former 15th Congressional District candidate Siobahn “Sam” Bennett who is also the former CEO of the nonprofit Properties of Merit, finally got some of the money it asked for — $2,000. Its initial request for $5,000 was whittled down after Lehigh County Commissioner Dr. Percy Dougherty said the nonprofit was too new and that older, more established nonprofits were getting less.

In citizen comments, Atty. David Harrington, of Lower Milford Township, warned the commissioners against revisiting Lehigh County law 2014-36 which he said sets the “specifics of interplay between ICE (U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement) and authorities in Lehigh County.”

According to Harrington, Arizona v. United States held in 2012 says states lack the constitutional ability to make or enforce immigration laws at the state or local level.

Harrington said he had heard rumblings that some elements of the local Tea Party want police to ask immigrants they come in contact with about their immigration status. He said he could “guarantee a lawsuit” if Lehigh County passes a law requiring that the local sheriff’s officers try to enforce federal immigration law.

In a separate interview, Dean Browning, chairman of the Lehigh Valley Tea Party’s immigration committee, provided a different perspective.

“Lehigh County does not honor detainer requests unless accompanied by a judicial order issued by a judge of the courts.”

He said the procedures that allowed an American citizen to be erroneously detained by Lehigh County Jail officers have changed. The procedure now, according to Browning, is that detainees are fingerprinted, the prints sent to the FBI, then when ICE reviews them they may decide to issue a detainee warrant if the detainee is an illegal immigrant.

He asserts there is no longer a need for a judge to approve an ICE warrant.

“It is our view,” Browning said, “that it is time to revisit [Lehigh County law] 2014-36. Times have changed.”

In response to claims Lehigh County is not a sanctuary city, Browning added, “The facts are that, as the result of a lawsuit settlement in 2014, the Lehigh County Board of Commissioners passed a resolution that said Lehigh County would not honor detainer requests issued by ICE unless they were also accompanied by a judicial issued order. It is this provision that makes Lehigh County non-complaint and a sanctuary jurisdiction.”