East Penn Press

Wednesday, December 11, 2019
PRESS PHOTO BY MACKENZIE CHRISTMANRecent patchwork done to the roadway at the intersection of Walnut and Third streets was called into question Sept. 11 when Alburtis Borough Council members discussed repaving the entire intersection. PRESS PHOTO BY MACKENZIE CHRISTMANRecent patchwork done to the roadway at the intersection of Walnut and Third streets was called into question Sept. 11 when Alburtis Borough Council members discussed repaving the entire intersection.

ALBURTIS BOROUGH COUNCIL

Thursday, September 19, 2019 by MAKENZIE CHRISTMAN Special to The Press in Local News

New community projects discussed

The Sept 11. Alburtis Borough Council meeting included a proposed handicap parking space at Hosfeld Insurance, 19 E. Main St. and a project to repave the intersection in front of Alburtis Elementary School.

Donna Hosfeld sought approval to create a handicap parking space for her insurance business. Hosfeld expressed concern for potential handicapped customers who may have to travel up the hill next to her business and wished to make it more handicap accessible.

Following her proposal, the council members discussed possible concerns — whether the handicap spot could limit parking for residents across the street. After discussion, the council determined the handicapped spot would best serve as a permanent one.

Second Vice President Kathleen Raines agreed with Knerr. Raines said she found it difficult to maneuver the hill on Franklin Street with her cane and a handicap spot would benefit people like her.

The council unanimously voted to carry Hosfeld’s proposal.

In other business, council discussed two appeals from the Lower Macungie Fire Department. The fire department sought to extend the yellow line near the fire hydrant to deter locals from parking there. This would allow swift mobility of the fire trucks in and out of the alley. Their second request was to make the entirety of Gold Alley a no parking area.

Council President Ron DeIaco felt the fire department’s wishes were urgent. “This is a public safety issue,” he said.

Both motions carried.

The council disputed the consideration of repaving the intersection on Walnut and Third streets.

Council member Sherryann Oels questioned whether repaving the intersection was necessary after potholes had previously been redone individually.

“To me, it doesn’t look that bad,” Oels said.

She also questioned the cost of the project, estimated at $24,000 — a bid Borough Manager Sharon Trexler received.

Council member Stephen Kaufman shared Oel’s concerns after hearing the initial cost.

“Is it a necessity or an emergency?” Kaufman questioned.

Council agreed to revisit the project once the borough received other bids and if it was considered an immediate issue.

The meeting ended with talk of the Pennsylvania Hardwoods Development Council timber harvesting plans and costs for replacing and updating office computers.