East Penn Press

Tuesday, June 25, 2019
PRESS PHOTO COURTESY OF BALL STATE ATHLETICS Lindsay (Quay) Volkert was a key player in three sports at Emmaus High School before going on to a successful college field hockey career. PRESS PHOTO COURTESY OF BALL STATE ATHLETICS Lindsay (Quay) Volkert was a key player in three sports at Emmaus High School before going on to a successful college field hockey career.
PRESS PHOTO COURTESY OF BALL STATE ATHLETICSLindsay (Quay) Volkert is surrounded by family members as she displays the Hall of Fame plaque she earned for her stellar college field hockey career at Ball State University. PRESS PHOTO COURTESY OF BALL STATE ATHLETICSLindsay (Quay) Volkert is surrounded by family members as she displays the Hall of Fame plaque she earned for her stellar college field hockey career at Ball State University.

Volkert inducted into Ball St. Hall of Fame

Thursday, February 28, 2019 by STEPHEN ALTHOUSE Special to the Press in Sports

As a basketball player at Emmaus High School, Lindsay (Quay) Volkert liked to mix it up.

“We had a lot of players who could score,” Volkert said in reflecting on her incredible career in green and yellow. “I loved playing defense. I have always been a physical player. I enjoyed battles under the basket and boxing out to get rebounds.”

Not only did Volkert love doing the dirty work both on the basketball court and the field hockey turf, she has been recognized for it by her teammates, coaches and by her college alma mater, Ball State University, which cemented her legacy with a 2017 enshrinement into the Ball State University Athletic Hall of Fame.

“This honor is a testament to all of the amazing coaches, teammates, friends, and most importantly my family that have had an impact on my life, as well as my athletic career,” she said recently.

During her playing days, Volkert was a humble, lunchpail type of player who was bearish on her own considerable talents and bullish on team honors.

In short, Lindsay Volkert was the perfect teammate.

“My parents (Patricia and Doug) were both good athletes at Allen, so they instilled in my sister (Erin), brother (Ryan) and I a love for all sports,” Quay recalled. “I would have to say it also helped having a very athletic brother and sister.”

As a youngster, Volkert and her siblings were always outside, playing sports. These athletic excursions left an indelible impression.

“They always helped me to get better and were my strongest supporters,” the 34-year-old Volkert recalled. “We are a very competitive family, so we all helped drive each other in all our activities.”

Those activities included playing sports until it was sometimes too dark to see the ball. She played as much as she could and as often as she could. Soccer, basketball, softball, tennis and field hockey, you name it. The man who proved to be most influential coach in her young career was Edward Geosits.

“He always held his players to a high standard and never demanded anything he didn’t think was attainable,” Volkert recalled. “He was tough when he needed to be, but he was also the first person to console you after a bad play or game. He helped me become a better athlete and person and I still carry his teachings with me today.”

Volkert eventually played field hockey, basketball and softball during her Emmaus career. When reflecting on her hoops memories, she was quick to point out her teammates.

“I was lucky enough to be surrounded by wonderful talent on the Emmaus basketball team,” Volkert said. “Emmaus field hockey is a proud tradition. We began playing together at a young age. My teammates were my best friends. Our coach, Sue Butz, is the major component of that proud tradition. Her coaching is the main reason behind my success as a forward.

“I was a physical player in field hockey as well, though my scoring was a major credit to my hardworking teammates.”

After graduating from Emmaus in 2003 it was off to Ball State, where she learned the responsibilities of being a collegiate student-athlete.

“Luckily, my transition from high school to college was made easier by the great coaches I had,” Volkert remembered. “Being a student-athlete in college is difficult. You have to learn how to balance your time between school and the sport you are playing. You would miss a day or two a week of classes if you were traveling to games for the weekend, so it was hard to make sure you stayed on top of all of your work..I believe it prepares you for your future and helps you adjust to anything life throws at you.”

Volkert was a superb field hockey player and two-time team captain at the university. She was named the 2003 Mid-American Conference Freshman of the Year and the 2006 Mid-American Conference Player of the Year.

“I am proud of all my accomplishments during my time at Ball State,” said Volkert. “I have made some truly special friends that are a big part of my life.”

She graduated from the school in 2007 with a degree in telecommunications and later earned a degree from Savannah College of Art and Design in 2010, where she majored in photography.

Today Volkert is a photographer, recently focusing on editing real estate photography and administrative work in Buffalo, N.Y., where she lives with her husband, Chuck Volkert (a 2001 Emmaus High School graduate), and their son, Charlie.

She loves photography, but coaching athletics could be in her future.

“I was blessed to have several outstanding coaches in my career, and I know, personally, the deep impact they have on their players,” Lindsay Volkert said. “I don’t think the timing is right for me at this moment. I do look forward to coaching my son when he gets older, and passing along the many lessons I have been luckily enough to learn.”

It is a matter-of-record that Lindsay Volkert was a distinguished high school and collegiate athlete. Yet, when it is all said and when it is all done, she would prefer to also be remembered as one of the girls.

“Being considered a good teammate with a great attitude is a high honor for me” she said. “I was fortunate to play for many selfless teams over my career. You learn from the people you play with, and I had an abundant amount of teammates that helped with that attribute.”