East Penn Press

Tuesday, December 18, 2018
PRESS PHOTO BY STEPHEN ALTHOUSEMembers of the Emmaus Garden Club decorate arrangements Nov. 29 at the 1803 House, Emmaus. The arrangements were displayed two days later at the home’s “Old Fashioned Christmas” open house. PRESS PHOTO BY STEPHEN ALTHOUSEMembers of the Emmaus Garden Club decorate arrangements Nov. 29 at the 1803 House, Emmaus. The arrangements were displayed two days later at the home’s “Old Fashioned Christmas” open house.

EMMAUS GARDEN CLUB

Thursday, December 6, 2018 by STEPHEN ALTHOUSE Special to The Press in Local News

Emmaus Garden Club brings holiday cheer to 1803 House

It’s beginning to look a lot like Christmas at the 1803 House in Emmaus, but you can’t credit Santa Claus or his elves for that.

Instead thank the Emmaus Garden Club, whose members spent a couple of hours Nov. 29 with their clippers creating windowsill arrangements for the historic home.

“We enjoy getting together and doing something such as this,” Faye Schuler, president of the garden club, said. “It’s something we take seriously.”

The club members diligently decorated arrangements to bring a little holiday cheer to the 16 windows in the historic home, in addition to decorating mantles, dressers and tables. The group also used materials that would have been available in 1803, such as evergreens, holly, berries and dried flowers.

The arrangements were on display two days later during the annual “Old Fashioned Christmas” open house. After the open house, the designs were taken to the Emmaus Public Library where they are bringing some holiday cheer to readers for the remainder of the season.

For the Emmaus Garden Club, uniting the community through their work is nothing new.

“We are a civic-minded organization,” Schuler said.

The Club was founded in January 1936 by Eva Butz and 13 years later became a member of the National and Pennsylvania Federation of Garden Clubs.

“Part of our mission is to give back to students,” Schuler said. “We award scholarship money to a deserving student.”

The group is also attempting to create more sustainable communities and educate their members about growing healthier crops. Meetings feature talks from master gardeners, flower show designers and conservation experts.