East Penn Press

Sunday, February 25, 2018
PRESS PHOTO BY APRIL PETERSONEmmaus Police Officer Carlos G. Marrero, who was a military police officer in the U.S. Army before joining the department in 2017, pauses for a photo in an interview room in the police department headquarters, 400 W. Jubilee St. PRESS PHOTO BY APRIL PETERSONEmmaus Police Officer Carlos G. Marrero, who was a military police officer in the U.S. Army before joining the department in 2017, pauses for a photo in an interview room in the police department headquarters, 400 W. Jubilee St.

EMMAUS POLICE

Wednesday, February 14, 2018 by April Peterson apeterson@tnonline.com in Police Log

Former military police officer finds a new law enforcement home in Emmaus

Emmaus Police Officer Carlos G. Marrero has been a police officer in a far corner of the globe.

The former U.S. Army military police officer served in Afghanistan where he was among those who taught Afghans the ins and outs of law enforcement – everything from handling weapons to conducting foot and mounted patrols.

No matter the skill or lessons, the core principle remained the same – the discipline necessary to be a police officer.

And Officer Marrero knows a lot about discipline.

When he left Puerto Rico in 2005 to join family, Marrero worked in warehouses.

His resolve next steeled Marrero to join the U.S. Army in 2008.

His service took him to Fort Riley, Kan. and Fort Polk, La.

In basic training, Marrero explained, he learned how to be a soldier. In the military police, “I learned how to be a cop,” he said.

According to the U.S. Army website, “Military police protect the lives and property on Army installations by enforcing military laws and regulations. They also control traffic, prevent crime and respond to all emergencies.”

Military police officers train in the field and in classrooms and training includes honing investigation skills, learning to collect evidence, traffic and crowd control and how to make arrests.

Among the helpful skills for those considering joining the military police, according to the Army, is “an ability to interact well with people.”

“I’m here to use the best of my abilities to help you,” Marrero said of his work with the Emmaus police and residents.

“I come in and do my best,” Marrero said.

Marrero officially joined the Emmaus Police Department in 2016 in a swearing in ceremony at Emmaus Borough Hall, joining officers Melanie Sayres, Kevin Miller and Dan MaGee in the oath.

Marrero has responded to calls from domestic disturbances to parking complaints.

“Pretty much everything,” he said of the variety.

“I like it. It’s good,” Marrero said of his job.

Marrero applied to several area departments before taking the job with the Emmaus Police Department. Emmaus, he said, was the first to call back.

“And here I am,” Marrero said.

Marrero said he saw snow for the first time in 2005 when he spent his first winter on the East Coast.

“I’m still not used to the cold,” he said.