East Penn Press

Friday, November 16, 2018
PRESS PHOTOS BY APRIL PETERSONMembers of the Emmaus Garden Club this spring took in hand the care and maintenance of plantings in Triangle Park, formerly an item on the to-do list for the public works department, according to Emmaus Borough Manager Shane Pepe. ABOVE: Late spring sun warms planters filled with lupine, mint, coreopsis, viola, geraniums and other plants. PRESS PHOTOS BY APRIL PETERSONMembers of the Emmaus Garden Club this spring took in hand the care and maintenance of plantings in Triangle Park, formerly an item on the to-do list for the public works department, according to Emmaus Borough Manager Shane Pepe. ABOVE: Late spring sun warms planters filled with lupine, mint, coreopsis, viola, geraniums and other plants.
A view of Triangle Park from the sidewalk at South Mountain Cycle and Cafe illustrates the variety of plantings featured. A view of Triangle Park from the sidewalk at South Mountain Cycle and Cafe illustrates the variety of plantings featured.
Hostas are among the plants Flagg selected for the large rectangular container gardens in Triangle Park. Hostas are among the plants Flagg selected for the large rectangular container gardens in Triangle Park.
Flagg considered several factors when selecting plants for the large planters including drought tolerance and filtered light produced by the trees in the planters. Other factors included the heights of the plantings and safety. For example, roses are not included in the beds because of the potential problem of thorns. Flagg considered several factors when selecting plants for the large planters including drought tolerance and filtered light produced by the trees in the planters. Other factors included the heights of the plantings and safety. For example, roses are not included in the beds because of the potential problem of thorns.

Volunteers provide plants and labor to beautify Triangle Park

Thursday, June 30, 2016 by April Peterson apeterson@tnonline.com in Local News

Sherri Flagg was in Triangle Park near the end of last summer when she decided the park was in need of something.

An avid gardener new to the area from Minneapolis, Minn., Flagg, added several gardens to surround her new Emmaus home.

And she saw her next project in the public space at Triangle Park.

Flagg, along with several other members of the Emmaus Garden Club, now tend the large rectangular planters in the park as well as the weeping tree.

“You want people to live in it,” Flagg said of the public park garden.

Flagg spent much of the winter tracking down who to contact to propose working in the planters and the trail led her to Rose Parry of the Emmaus Garden Club. Parry is among those helping Flagg with the Triangle Park planters.

“We gave them the freedom to beautify it the way they wanted,” Shane Pepe, Emmaus borough manager, said by telephone of the effort by Flagg and members of the Emmaus Garden Club. “It really adds to the beauty of the borough.”

The garden club approached the borough with a proposal to tend the beds in Triangle Park asking if the public works department personnel would do some extra mulching in the park this year, according to Pepe.

Drought tolerance and survival in filtered light were among factors considered in selecting plants for the large containers, Flagg said. Hostas, lupine, daises, viola, coreopsis, cosmos, geraniums and mint are among the plants populating the raised beds. Flagg said mums and holly may be placed in the planters in the fall.

“We’ll let things sleep for the winter,” Flagg said.

Pepe described the plantings as “stunning,” noting recent visitors to the borough commented on the beauty of the park. Borough residents and business owners also have commented on the work done, Pepe said.

Space has been left in the garden to encourage others interested in planting, Flagg said. Education and kids groups are especially welcome.

Meanwhile, Flagg, friends and members of the garden club will continue their efforts to keep Triangle Park gardens vibrant.

“It’s been a really great project for me,” Flagg said, who describes herself as a designer, landscaper, labeler and benefactor of the park.

“Next summer should be even more interesting.”