East Penn Press

Friday, June 22, 2018
PRESS PHOTO BY TIM SINGLESThe cast and crew of Lower Macungie Middle School Theatre prepare for the presentation of “Trick Play” debuting 7:30 p.m. Nov. 19, 20 and 21 at the Lower Macungie Middle School. PRESS PHOTO BY TIM SINGLESThe cast and crew of Lower Macungie Middle School Theatre prepare for the presentation of “Trick Play” debuting 7:30 p.m. Nov. 19, 20 and 21 at the Lower Macungie Middle School.
Conference planner Julie, played by Alena Slak, listens as loan shark John makes a threat during this comedy written by Director Patrick Campbell and theater students. Conference planner Julie, played by Alena Slak, listens as loan shark John makes a threat during this comedy written by Director Patrick Campbell and theater students.
Several guests and hotel employees watch as Zach, played by Jon Whitby, investigates the meat for dinner as he fears there is something funny about it in “Hotel Has Been.” Several guests and hotel employees watch as Zach, played by Jon Whitby, investigates the meat for dinner as he fears there is something funny about it in “Hotel Has Been.”
PRESS PHOTOS BY TIM SINGLESDan, played by Dylan Michael, and Zach, played by Jon Whitby, watch an argument at the hotel lobby desk. PRESS PHOTOS BY TIM SINGLESDan, played by Dylan Michael, and Zach, played by Jon Whitby, watch an argument at the hotel lobby desk.
Dan, played by Dylan Michael, tries to convince his sister Effy, played by Maddie Brown, to pretend to be a world famous soccer star. Dan, played by Dylan Michael, tries to convince his sister Effy, played by Maddie Brown, to pretend to be a world famous soccer star.

LMMS Theatre presents ‘Trick Play’

Thursday, November 19, 2015 by cindy singlesSpecial to The Press in Local News

Lower Macungie Middle School Theatre will entertain audiences with laughter as it presents “Trick Play” 7:30 p.m. Nov. 19, 20 and 21 in the school’s auditorium.

Seating is general admission and tickets will be sold at the door.

This year’s fall comedy has never been done before and is unique because it is LMMS Theatre’s original work.

Starting with a skeleton script, Director Patrick Campbell and theater students were part of the creative process of writing the play and creating the storyline as they went along, building the comedy scene by scene until completion.

The farce begins in “Hotel Has Been” with the spotlight on Julie who has been given the job of planning a soccer conference in her uncle’s run-down hotel. When no one pre-registers for the conference and the soccer star Betsy Price cancels, Julie is fearful of being fired. Dan, a delivery man at the hotel, who is also fond of Julie, decides to help her.

Dan designs a plan to have his ditzy sister Effy, who wants to be an actress and resembles Betsy Price in appearance, pretend to be the world famous soccer player. People will register for the conference and Julie keeps her job.

The fun begins as Dan and Effy, who knows nothing about soccer, try to pull off this farce and keep her true identity from everyone.

Colorful characters such as an uptight bellhop, two tough soccer coaches, a dog (they think Effy killed by feeding it chocolate) who keeps disappearing, a bitter rich lady and the announcement the governor is arriving for the conference and you have some hilarious antics happening. The audience will have laughs while wondering if they will actually pull off this charade.

Alena Slak plays Julie Tower the conference coordinator.

“I really like her personality. She is always really nice to people but you can still tell she’s undergoing a lot of stress which she mostly keeps to herself,” Slak said. “When she expresses it through words she’s not mean about it.” Slak likes playing a main character. “Being a main character teaches you a lot of responsibility and by memorizing the lines it helps you develop skills in the classroom too; it helps you memorize vocabulary in class and helps me establish skills for plays I’m doing later on in life.”

Alicia Hover describes being in theater as “we’re all like one big family.” She plays the part of the governor. She likes acting.

“You can leave all your worries behind and become another person and take on their mannerisms,” Hover said. “I enjoy that. I’m a very shy person; when I go on stage I feel like I can get out of my box and yell and just be silly.” Hover describes the governor as a very sarcastic person–– very snippy, yet she’s still nice and has good intentions. “I like her sarcasm. She comes into the hotel and creates a lot of stress,” Hover said.

Previously doing musicals, this comedy has given Hover acting experience in a different way. She relies on her brother to help her learn her lines. Hover hopes the audiences laugh and enjoy the play. “I love what we added to the script, a lot of jokes and comedy. I like the overall story of the play, the more pressure that keeps getting added and added – I think we have such a climax at the end and rolls down in the last scene at the end,” Hover said.

Colette McDonald is one of the heads of the run crew. She likes being part of theater and hanging out with all her friends. She describes it as a good experience and enjoys guiding the crew with changing props and set designs between scenes. She is so glad a friend convinced her to sign up when she started at LMMS and really enjoys being with the run crew.

McDonald would like to encourage anyone interested in trying theater.

“I would say just go for it,” McDonald said. “It’s such a fun time. If you don’t make the cast join crew.”

McDonald thinks this play is a good modern one and thinks the storyline is really funny. She likes the scenes with the character Zach, and his sarcastic witty comments to everything.

“I honestly just hope they (audience) have a good time watching the play because everyone has put so much effort into it,” McDonald said.

Nick Churetta is also one of the heads of the run crew.

“Everyone here is like one big family and everyone is just so tight, knows everyone and it’s just an awesome experience,” Churetta said.

Both Churetta and McDonald said, “There’s a lot of time that goes in it. I don’t know how Mr. Campbell does it. He does it really well, though.”

Churetta describes the play as “sarcastic and a lot of jokes; some characters don’t pick up on what other characters are doing, I hope the audiences pick up on the jokes. The whole play is good. It’s just a good play.”