East Penn Press

Sunday, August 19, 2018
PRESS PHOTO BY APRIL PETERSON David Jaindl, scion of Jaindl Turkey Farms, talks about the early days of the business, its present and its future at the monthly meeting of the Greater Lehigh Valley Chamber of Commerce at Brookside Country Club March 19. PRESS PHOTO BY APRIL PETERSON David Jaindl, scion of Jaindl Turkey Farms, talks about the early days of the business, its present and its future at the monthly meeting of the Greater Lehigh Valley Chamber of Commerce at Brookside Country Club March 19.
Jaindl's visual aids included maps detailing future land development projects and a expertly made video about the farm. Jaindl's visual aids included maps detailing future land development projects and a expertly made video about the farm.

Jaindl talks about the past, present and future of Jaindl farms

Wednesday, March 26, 2014 by APRIL PETERSON apeterson@tnonline.com in Local News

Here is a fun fact: Jaindl turkeys are available in Japan.

In a talk given to the Greater Lehigh Valley Chamber of Commerce March 19, David Jaindl, scion of the Jaindl agriculture and land development businesses, told business leaders the company's smaller birds, weighing in at about six pounds, are available in food markets in Tokyo. Jaindl offered a family anecdote as proof.

A friend of the family who married and moved to Japan got in touch after she saw a Jaindl turkey in her local grocery more than 6,500 miles away from the Pennsylvania home she grew up in next door to the Jaindl farm. The tiny turkey, preferred in Japan for its compact size, cost fowl connoisseurs just about $6 a pound, Jaindl said.

And then there was the thing with the King.

A special request came in to the turkey purveyors for 12 20-pound hens, or female turkeys, for Abdullah II of Jordan.

The turkeys, often misidentified as flightless fowl, were flown to the Middle East.

Jaindl peppered his talk to the Chamber membership with tales of the early days of the farm through acquisitions of another stalwart of local agriculture, Schantz Orchards in 1987, to the company's inroads into land development, including updating members on planned warehouse facilties in Lower Macungie Township.

"That is the market," Jaindl said of the warehouses set to come to what some consider the bucolic idyll of Lower Macungie Township. Distribution facilities are needed, Jaindl continued.

"Things are progressing in a very positive way," Jaindl told a reporter in comments after the meeting about the land development project in Lower Macungie Township.

Jessica O'Donnell, affiliated chambers administrator with the Greater Lehigh Valley Chamber of Commerce, noted the larger-than-usual turn out for the monthly meeting, attributing the high response to Jaindl. For example, Lehigh County Executive Tom Muller was among those at the meeting.

"He has a following," O'Donnell said.

Jaindl future plans include an increased presence in real estate.

Noting the dwindling availability of land to develop, Jaindl said ownership of buildings, such as office and small industrial facilities, may be in the near future for the family-run business. The Jaindl name will remain tied to farming and agriculture, especially turkey farming, while increasing the family presence in land and real estate.