East Penn Press

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PRESS PHOTOS BY JIM MARSH U.S. Congressman Charlie Dent, R-15th, answers questions after a presentation at Parkland High School April 13 to parents and students interested in the process of applying and competing for a congressional nomination to one of the country's military academies. PRESS PHOTOS BY JIM MARSH U.S. Congressman Charlie Dent, R-15th, answers questions after a presentation at Parkland High School April 13 to parents and students interested in the process of applying and competing for a congressional nomination to one of the country's military academies.
Parkland High School junior Kristen McCarty, of Orefield, listens as retired Lt. Col. Jill Maurer, of Bethlehem, describes the leadership qualities necessary for applicants to the U.S. Military Academy at West Point. Parkland High School junior Kristen McCarty, of Orefield, listens as retired Lt. Col. Jill Maurer, of Bethlehem, describes the leadership qualities necessary for applicants to the U.S. Military Academy at West Point.

U.S. Congressman Charlie Dent, R-15th, hosts students, parents at military service academy information event

Wednesday, April 17, 2013 by JIM MARSH Special to The Press in Local News

Recruiters for the nation's five military service academies were on hand April 13 for an information day hosted by U.S. Congressman Charlie Dent, R-15th.

Dent described the competitive process of applying for a Congressional nomination to one or more of the country's military service academies.

Recruiters from the U.S. Army Military Academy at West Point, N.Y.; the U.S. Naval Academy at Annapolis, Md.; the U.S. Air Force Academy, in Colorado Springs, Colo.; the U.S. Coast Guard Academy, in New London, Conn.; and the U.S. Merchant Marine Academy, in Kings Point, N.Y., provided one-on-one advice on the leadership qualities sought in applicants to the service academies.

Recruiters emphasized the importance of leadership characteristics demanded of successful academy applicants. "We don't want to hear that a student belonged to this or that group, or participated in this or that organization, and is a really good person; we are looking for leaders, and that needs to be the emphasis in the recommendation letters our applicants submit," was the message each drove home.

Dent provided the important milestones for junior and senior students as they weave their way through the lengthy and competitive process of applying for a Congressional nomination to an academy.

"This was a great opportunity for young people who are interested in attending a university at one of our service academies to gain information about the admissions process and the requirements that go with attending and serving," Dent said.

A Dent aide said the privilege of nominating some of the best and brightest students in the 15th Congressional District to our nation's service academies is one of the most important and meaningful aspects of being a member of congress.

U.S. Service Academy graduates receive a first-rate undergraduate education, equivalent to that provided by a top-tier, Ivy League school, with options to pursue advanced degrees; spend a minimum of five years serving their country on active duty as a military officer; and are provided with an education and experience that will provide a world of career opportunities.

The full four-year scholarship is valued at more than $350,000 which includes tuition, room and board, medical and dental care and a monthly salary. Students learn discipline, moral ethics and teamwork in a structured environment that fosters leadership and character development.

Admission to a service academy is a competitive two-step process. The first step is to obtain a nomination from an authorized source. The second step is to receive an appointment from the academy. The nomination allows students to compete for the appointment but does not guarantee an appointment.